Huge drop in accidents predicted when cars go driverless | Smart Highways Magazine: Industry News

Huge drop in accidents predicted when cars go driverless

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A new report’s suggesting that car accidents could be cut by up to 95% if all cars were autonomous.

The Institution of Mechanical Engineers is calling for urgent Government and industry action to encourage the greater use the technology by resolving legislative, technological and insurance issues.

“The benefits to this sort of technology are huge, with estimates that the overall UK economic benefit could be as much as £51 billion a year due to fewer accidents, improved productivity and increased trade,” said Philippa Oldham, Head of Transport at the Institution and Lead Author of the report.  “Currently 95% of all crashes happen due to driver error, so it makes sense for Government, industry and academia to redouble efforts to look at how we phase out human involvement in driving vehicles.

“There needs to be much more action from Government to help integrate driverless vehicles into the current UK transport network.  This will include updates and standardisation to road signage and road markings to enable these driverless vehicles to operate in the safest way possible.”

The Autonomous and Driverless cars report makes three key recommendations:

  • The Transport Systems Catapult conduct a public consultation, bringing together a working group that includes industry, legislators, regulators and members of the general public. This group should look at how we can integrate and implement new regulatory regimes.
  • All car dealerships and garages must work with vehicle manufacturers to ensure that they can provide adequate information, and give the required training, to any new purchaser of a vehicle.
  • The Department for Transport needs to address the safety issues of mixed road use, looking at how autonomous vehicles can be integrated onto our road network with appropriate road signage and markings in place or updated.

Picture – Phillipa Oldham, LinkedIn

 
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