Europe sets out C-CAV strategy | Smart Highways Magazine: Industry News

Europe sets out C-CAV strategy

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The European Union has set out its strategy on Cooperative Intelligent Transport Systems (C-ITS), which it calls a milestone initiative towards cooperative, connected and automated mobility.

It says the Strategy will make it possible to deploy vehicles that can “talk” to each other and to the transport infrastructure on EU roads as of 2019.

“The market potential of cooperative, connected and automated driving is estimated to be worth dozens of billions of euro annually and to lead to the creation of many new jobs”, it says in a statement.  “The Strategy therefore delivers on the Commission’s political priorities, notably its Agenda for Jobs, Growth and Investment, the Digital Single Market and the Energy Union.

The main elements of the strategy are:

1. Avoid a fragmented internal market
Many C-ITS deployment activities are currently taking place in the EU, often supported through EU funds. The industry has stated its intention to start full scale deployment of C-ITS enabled vehicles in 2019. The first objective of the Strategy is therefore to avoid a fragmented internal market in the field of C-ITS and to create synergies between different initiatives, in order to ensure continuity and interoperability of C-ITS services throughout Europe.

2. Define and support common priorities
In order to ensure continuity, availability of C-ITS services across the EU for end-users must be ensured. This is why the Strategy considers a list of technologically mature C-ITS services with clear benefits for transport and society at large, which should be deployed quickly throughout the EU by Member States and local authorities, vehicle manufacturers, road operators and the ITS industry. The Strategy also includes actions to support Member States and industry financially in deploying such services.

3. Use a mix of communication technologies
C-ITS messages will be transmitted for a wide range of services, in various transport situations and between different actors. Generally, drivers are indifferent to the communication technology used to transmit C-ITS messages, but they will increasingly expect to receive all information on traffic and safety conditions seamlessly across Europe. To achieve this, the Strategy presents a hybrid communication approach combining complementary and available communication technologies. Currently, the most promising hybrid communication mix is a combination of WiFi based short range communication and existing cellular networks.

4. Address security and data protection issues
When it comes to connectivity, security and data protection issues become critical. Security of communications must be ensured, and citizens must have the assurance that their data are protected and used properly. This is why the Strategy includes the development of a common EU security policy for C-ITS, as well as specific actions to safeguard the right of citizens to control their personal data.

5. Develop the right legal framework
A specific framework is needed to provide legal certainty to public and private investors, and to ensure that the necessary technical rules (services, communication technologies, standards, frequencies, security, data protection etc.) are widely applied, leading to interoperability and continuity of C-ITS services throughout the EU. This is why the Strategy includes the development of such a legal framework, in close cooperation with, and learning from experience of C-ITS deployment projects such as the initiatives gathered under the C-ROADS platform.

6. Cooperate at international level
The C-ITS market is developing globally, international cooperation is already taking place with Australia, Japan, Singapore, the US and within the G7 in areas such as research, security and the development and harmonisation of standards. The Strategy includes the continuation of cooperation with international partners and initiatives in order to learn from each other, in particular the twinning of research and innovation projects.

You can read the full statement here and the full report here.

 
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